Inspiration.

Agnes Treplin
BODY and SOUL

The painting Dead Christ Mourned by Two Angels (1617-18) by Guercino represents the starting point for my investigation into the phenomenon or essence called ‘soul’ and, as in this case, the absence of it. My interest is to find a way to manifest and express in a three-dimensional form motifs and ideas that are not physical.

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Response.

Inspiration.

Simon Thorogood
Coruscation

My contribution to Flight: Drawing Interpretations owes its origins to happenstance and particular circumstances that shaped a design story. Flight, aircraft and a notion of travel have long been a prevailing feature in my work.

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Response.

Inspiration.

Carolina Rieckhof
Samson’s fears

In focussing on Samson and Delilah (c. 1609-1610) by Rubens, I was initially interested in representing Delilah’s thoughts, but while researching on Samson and Delilah’s story, I found inspiration in the psychological interpretations of this painting, which rather point to Samson fears.

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Response.

Inspiration.

Yuliya Krylova
Leda’s Womb

Yuliya Krilova’s work explores myths, the transition from Paganism to Christianity, poetry (Hilda Doolittle, William Yeats), feminist art, science, psychology, and concentrates on the theme of the phallic mother.

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Inspiration.

Andrew Kenny
Ode to Colin Wiggins

The National Gallery was founded ‘to give the people an ennobling enjoyment’ (Parliamentary Commission, 1857), and this democratic approach to high-art is what I intend to explore within my contribution to Flight: Drawing Interpretations. My aim is to find out how people today gain this ‘ennobling enjoyment’ and, in particular, how this relates to the specialism of Textiles for Fashion.

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Inspiration.

Charlotte Hodes
Apparition, a series of papercuts

I have approached the project Flight: Drawing Interpretations as a conversation with selected paintings in the National Gallery in order to address some of the themes that continue to preoccupy me in my fine art practice.

Visit Project

In Progress.

Response.

Inspiration.

Caroline Collinge
Unfolding the box

I have been researching A Peepshow with Views of the Interior of a Dutch House (c. 1655-60) by Samuel van Hoogstraten: a Baroque perspective box that uses multiple-perspective to create the sensation of flight through the optical perception of movement.

Visit Project

In Progress.

Response.

Inspiration.

Xenia Capacete Caballero
Weaving Nests. Tracing the Invisible

Xenia Capacete Caballero explores movement and location through various techniques as drawing, painting, photography and textiles. Her artwork, titled Weaving Nests. Tracing the Invisible, takes the form of maps and patterns that let unexpected narratives emerge.

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Response.

Inspiration.

Dr. Jessica Bugg
Drawing with the body and cloth

My work for Flight: Drawing Interpretations seeks to extend design methods for clothing in contemporary dance. Costume design, and specifically costume design for contemporary dance, tends to be applied to a specific choreography as opposed to being central to the development of the performance and communication itself.

Visit Project

In Progress.

Response.

Inspiration.

Natalie Brown
Stitch in the Air

I intend to investigate the representation of Punto in Aria (‘stitch in the air’) and the Seventeenth century Reticella needle lace work. The intricate, handmade needle lace work uses stitch alone to construct a fabric surface worn around the neck. This neckwear came to symbolise high fashion during the second half of the Sixteenth and early Seventeenth centuries.

Visit Project

In Progress.

Response.

Inspiration.

Paul Bevan
(Up) In the Air

For (Up) In the Air I have drawn on for reference to the painting An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768), by Joseph Wright 'of Derby'. In this work, which represents a bird chosen as the victim of an experiment as the air is sucked away by a pump, there are significant instances of flight, not least the very defiance of it.

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Response.

  • Agnes Treplin
    BODY and SOUL

    Project Summary

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    Agnes Treplin is Course Leader of the MA Costume for Performance, at London College of Fashion, and a practicing stage designer who has worked on numerous productions for opera, dance, theatre, musicals, film, TV in Germany, UK, Japan and the Middle East. Her recent designs include The Marriage of Figaro and Don Pasquale (ETO), Last 5 Years (Barbican), The Rise of the Phoenix, Gibran The Prophet and Don Quixote for the Byblos International Festival in Lebanon, The Coronation of Poppea (Kyoto and Tokyo, Japan), Othello (Basingstoke Theatre), Warsaw Melody, Life on The Borderline (Arcola Theatre), Phaedra, Yerma’s Eggs, Nirvana, Four Knights in Knaresborough (Riverside Studios), Glassbody, an installation performance piece for the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London. Treplin has designed many productions for the Nuffield Theatre Southampton, LAMDA, RADA, GSMD, Royal College of Music and Drama Centre, London. She has taught Theatre Design at Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design for over 10 years before taking over the MA Costume Design for Performance at London College of Fashion.

    a.treplin@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    BODY and SOUL

    Artist’s statement

    The painting Dead Christ Mourned by Two Angels (1617-18) by Guercino represents the starting point for my investigation into the phenomenon or essence called ‘soul’ and, as in this case, the absence of it. My interest is to find a way to manifest and express in a three-dimensional form motifs and ideas that are not physical.

    As a stage designer, I create environments that are not realistic or naturalistic locations but spaces where the audience is immersed into a particular atmosphere, which is central to the fundamental themes and emotions addressed by the play. For this project my aim is to explore a sensation that I have directly experienced and capture it with the means of a costume, which is then brought to life and transformed in a performance.

    In the Guercino painting the Angels mourn the dead Christ, whose body is painted very lifelike while his head seems to already belong to a world beyond human reach. Having closely witnessed the death of someone, I perceived what in many cultures is described as ‘aura’. Although not exactly visible, this was for me certainly tangible in the way I experienced the living and the dead person. In addition to the mere physicality of the body, the concepts of aura and soul seem to significantly contribute to the way we experience and refer to each other’s presence.

    Through my enquiry, which is not of scientific or religious nature, I have found inspiration in other artists who explore the ideas of absence and presence. Antony Gormley’s wire sculptures, for instance, give a sense of a body much larger than the actual ‘inner’ shape, yet the body itself is absent. For the sculpture Dead Dad (1996-1997), Ron Mueck made an almost exact wax model of his dead father but in a smaller scale, which questions the way we experience ‘reality’.

    For the project Body and Soul I have concentrated on the body of Christ in the Guercino painting and experimented with various drawing techniques, focussing on lines and shapes I found most essential for expressing the body.

    The aim is to bring alive the metaphysical idea of the soul leaving the body, by translating the drawings into a 3D object that gets transformed by a performer as if the soul is set free from the restraints imposed by the physicality of the body.

    The idea is that the painting is turned into 3D, not merely as a sculpture or object but as a live performance that attempts to capture the atmosphere of loss and the transformation of Christ’s body in the process of resurrection. The performance is then recorded, thus entering another dimension extending beyond the painting and the body in space.

     

  • Andrew Kenny
    Ode to Colin Wiggins

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    Andrew Kenny is Lecturer in Fashion Textiles at London College of Fashion. He studied Textiles at Goldsmiths College, and obtained his MA in Textiles (Mixed Media) from Royal College of Art. He is Director of the London Embroidery Studio, which he established in 2007 and specialises in the design and production of bespoke embroidery for artists and designers.  Louis Vuitton, BBC, The Collection Design Studio, Hew Locke, Oliver Clegg and Nicolas Kirkwood are among his clients. Andrew’s research explores themes of user-centred design, the subversion of machines and CAD programs, social comment and anthropological research translated into textile design. His work has been published in magazines such as Vogue Russia, GQ Russia, Style Magazines, and platforms as WGSN. He participated in numerous exhibitions in UK (MAN Group Drawing Prize & Exhibition, Royal College of Art, 2011; White Feast, London Design Week, 2010; RIM, Blackberry design competition and exhibition, 2010), and in London (2006) and Moscow (2006) Fashion Weeks.

    http://www.andykenny.co.uk/ a.kenny@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    Ode to Colin Wiggins

    Artist’s statement

    The National Gallery was founded ‘to give the people an ennobling enjoyment’ (Parliamentary Commission, 1857), and this democratic approach to high-art is what I intend to explore within my contribution to Flight: Drawing Interpretations. My aim is to find out how people today gain this ‘ennobling enjoyment’ and, in particular, how this relates to the specialism of Textiles for Fashion.

    To do this I asked my undergraduate textiles students to visit the gallery and pick out two or three paintings that most appealed to them. At the gallery, I filmed the students discussing why they liked those particular paintings and how they inspired their own practice. I was accompanied on these interviews by Colin Wiggins, Head of Education at the NG, and asked him to talk to the students and myself about each painting. I was stuck not only by Colin’s vast knowledge, but also by how he managed to bring each painting to life by connecting its story directly to the concerns of the students.

    To draw from this research and to represent storytelling, I have explored the textile medium of patchwork and found inspiration in works as Portrait of a Woman (c. 1525) by Lucas Cranach the Elder and A Nymph by a Stream (1869-70) by Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

    My final piece, entitled Ode to Colin Wiggins takes the form of a full-scale patchwork quilt, and brings together many drawings based on the interviews that I conducted. These drawings are printed and embroidered by hand to illustrate the ongoing human narrative responses to the paintings, and celebrates the inspiration one can gain from visiting the National Gallery and from meeting its Special Projects Curator.

  • Carolina Rieckhof
    Samson’s fears

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    Carolina Rieckhof is a visual artist and costume designer. She was born in 1979 in Lima, Peru, where she studied sculpture and won an art national contest that brought here to Europe. She had two art residencies in Paris and studied on the MA Costume for Performance at London College of Fashion. In her work she explores the relationship between the body, costumes, sculpture and space. She has recently been working on the ‘Somatic Movement and Costume Project’, a Middlesex University Art Residency, for which she makes costumes for specific body-mind experiences. The project was part of ‘On Collaboration’ Middlesex University Symposium in 2012. Her work has been exhibited in Lima, London, Sri Lanka and Paris. She now lives and works in London.

    http://wwwcarolinarieckhof.blogspot.co.uk/ http://showtime.arts.ac.uk/RicaRieckhof rietecaro@hotmail.com

     

     

    Samson’s fears

    Artist’s statement

    My approach to the project consists in interpreting the idea of flight as a journey, the journey of the artist in response to a particular painting. In focussing on Samson and Delilah (c. 1609-1610) by Rubens, I was initially interested in representing Delilah’s thoughts, but while researching on Samson and Delilah’s story, I found inspiration in the psychological interpretations of this painting, which rather point to Samson fears. Delilah indeed embodies men’s deeply rooted fear of the danger threatened by the erotic involvement with a woman. As Madlyn Kahr argues in ‘Delilah’, throughout Samson’s story ‘runs the threat of punishment for his sexual drives. It is only through his own acquiescence that the punishment can take place’.

    The initial drawing process took place in the National Gallery space, and progressively relied on the research on regret and guilt as well as on pictures of the painting to portray Delilah’s face expression.  I then focused on and isolated the couple, Samson and Delilah, by covering the other characters with ink.

    I made drawings in response to the underlying fear of the female and castration, concentrating on Samson and understanding Delilah as a presence who triggers Samson’s conflicts rather than the cause of his defeat. I finally tried to translate these ideas into a three-dimensional work, which takes the form of a bed installation consisting of two soft sculptures and a bed.

    Kahr, M. (1972) ‘Delilah’, The Art Bulletin, Vol. 54, No. 3, pp. 282-299.

  • Caroline Collinge
    Unfolding the box

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    Caroline Collinge is currently undertaking her PhD at London College of Fashion, on ‘Costuming Space: the relationship between body, costume and performance through a Baroque perspective’, which explores the crossover between costume and architectural space within performance. Her production design has included the short film Scrubber (2011) directed by Romola Garai, which was winner of the London Short Film Festival Underwire Award (2013) and was part of Sundance Film Festival (2013), New British Cinema Quarterly UK (2012), Cannes International Film Festival (2012). Recent costume design commissions include: a dance piece in collaboration with Norwegian choreographer Siri Dybwik, Stavanger Konserthus, Norway (2013); Philip Glass opera The Sound of a Voice directed by Andrea Ferran, Grimeborn Festival at the Arcola Tent (2012); research and development, funded by the Arts Council, which features the collaboration of a virtuoso cellist and an architect for a production based on the Bach Cello Suites (2012). Visual art commissions include Brass: Pitch for Durham International Festival (2012) and Global Footprint cultural Olympiad project, exhibited at Northampton shoe lounge (2012). As a consultant artist for the Thames Festival Trust, she carried out workshops in London schools for the Rivers of the World education programme, with the final artwork exhibited during the Thames Mayoral Festival and a British Council international tour (2012-13).

    http://www.cabinetofcuriosity.org/ http://goo.gl/p9RXN c.collinge4@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    Unfolding the box 

    Artist’s statement

    I have been researching A Peepshow with Views of the Interior of a Dutch House (c. 1655-60) by Samuel van Hoogstraten: a Baroque perspective box that uses multiple-perspective to create the sensation of flight through the optical perception of movement. Methods I have pursued for this project include ‘unfolding the box’ to re-trace the perspectival techniques used to construct the architectural space of the Dutch interior. The unique characteristic of the perspective box is the absence of the physical or visual representation of a body within the space. Therefore, the viewer has the sensation that his own body inhabits this box. Through recomposing the architectural space of the perspective box and applying the techniques to the costumed body of a performer in movement, the outcome is a ‘costumed space’ involving the intersection of body and space through perspective and performance. The final performance involves the participation of experienced cellist soloist and chamber musician Li Lu, who is a member of the Concordia Foundation, a charity that supports young professional musicians on the threshold of their careers in the pursuit of excellence.

    This project has been supported by the Arts Council England and a UAL SEE&DO bursary.

  • Charlotte Hodes
    Apparition, a series of papercuts

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    Charlotte Hodes is Professor in Fine Art at London College of Fashion, where she coordinates the Forum for Drawing research hub. This constitutes the platform for a dialogue on the practice and theory of drawing, which encompasses ‘hands on’ and digital methods. Hodes’ research is informed by her experience as a painter and takes the form of large scale paper-cuts as well as ceramic vessels and glass. Her artwork draws upon the decorative and applied arts, fashion and costume, often taking inspiration from archives and collections such as The Wallace Collection, Spode Museum Trust, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the archives at London College of Fashion. She was awarded the Jerwood Drawing Prize (2006) and received Individual Artist Awards from the Arts Council of England  (2004 & 2006) and grants from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (2005 & 2008). Her work on glass is to feature in the exhibition Glasstress: White Light/White Heat within the Venice Biennale (2013). She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally, at numerous venues including No.10 Downing St (2012), National Glass Centre, University of Sunderland (2012), Marlborough Fine Art London (solo show 2010), The Wallace Collection (solo show, 2007), ‘Glasstress’ at the 53rd International Venice Biennale (2009) and Millesgården Stockholm, Sweden (2011).

    http://charlottehodes.com/ http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/staff/a-z/charlotte-hodes/ c.hodes@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    Apparition, a series of papercuts

    Artist’s statement

    I have approached the project Flight: Drawing Interpretations as a conversation with selected paintings in the National Gallery in order to address some of the themes that continue to preoccupy me in my fine art practice. I am interested in how to represent the female figure as a fleeting silhouette and a momentary participant in the physical world. An important question running throughout my work is how the physicality, intricacy and layering of the ‘craft’ making process of collage can act as a counterpoint to the depiction of the elusive subject matter of transience.

    Initially I selected paintings that portray the female figure in flight from danger. In Jacopo Tintoretto’s St George and the Dragon  (c. 1555) the maiden flees out of the picture plane to the right towards the viewer, while in Niccolò dell’ Abate’s Death of Eurydice  Death of Eurydice  (c.1552-71 ) the eye is led from left to right across the picture plane as the narrative unfolds. This echoes many of my own compositions in papercut as Fête Galantes I-VIII (2007) and the series Silhouettes & Filigree (2009).

    Although in movement, my own figures are not moving away or fleeing from any apparent danger. Rather, they are invariably acting as if they are incidental, disinterested participants in the pictorial narrative. I thus researched paintings in which the protagonists are not only notional participants to the action but also ‘in flight’ upwards, suspended in the air, defying gravity and the necessity to be literally grounded. In Perugino’s The Virgin and Child with an Angel  (1496-1500), Raphael’s The Mond Crucifixion  (1502-03), Sandro Botticelli’s St Francis of Assisi with Angels (c.1475-80) or Simon Marmion’s The Soul of St Bertin Carried up to God  (1459), for instance, the angels although substantial in form are freed from the logical restraint of gravity. The element of drapery, represented in all the selected National Gallery paintings, implies movement by articulating the air that the figures occupy. The swirling drapery of Marmion’s angels is densely physical in contrast to the sky in which they are mysteriously suspended.

    In the papercuts created for Flight: Drawing Interpretations, the compositions depict the figure above the ground, suspended. There is a tension between the implied weight and the physicality of the collaged elements, between the figure and drapery and the weightlessness of the space they occupy.

  • Dr. Jessica Bugg
    Drawing with the body and cloth

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    Jessica Bugg is Principle Lecturer in Performance and Research Development Co-coordinator for the School of Media and Communication, London College of Fashion. She is a fashion and costume designer, whose practice lays at the intersection of fashion, fine art and performance. Her PhD 'Interface: concept and context as strategies for innovative fashion design and communication' (University of The Arts London) explored innovative design methods and concepts informed by interdisciplinary practice, and resulted in contemporary dance performances driven by costume. Her work investigates the complexity of communication between designer, wearer and viewer of conceptual fashion in specific contexts. She is member of the Theatre & Performance Research Association and has exhibited her work in UK, South Korea (Creative Costume, National Museum of Korea, Seoul, 2010; WAVE, Ewha Arts Centre - Post Gallery, Seoul, 2007), and Hong Kong (When Photography and Drawing Meet Fashion, Poly University, 2008). Among recent performances and commissions are: costume design for Juliet Russell and Off the beaten track (Camberwell Arts Festival in collaboration with the Barbican Art Gallery, 2010); Sensing Change (2006) shown at venues as Queen Elizabeth Hall, South Bank, London and Linbury Space, Royal Opera House, The Place London, and at the Bolzano Festival, Italy.


    http://jessicabuggdesign.com/ http://goo.gl/rkqLE j.bugg@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    Embodied design and communication: drawing with the body and clot

    Artist’s statement

    My work for Flight: Drawing Interpretations seeks to extend design methods for clothing in contemporary dance. Costume design, and specifically costume design for contemporary dance, tends to be applied to a specific choreography as opposed to being central to the development of the performance and communication itself. My current research challenges this approach and focuses on the relationship between a designer and a dancer in the development of a performance, exposing how clothing can be implicit in the conceptualisation, development and communication process.

    I work collaboratively with a dancer, Fukiko Takase (Random Dance Company), to respond to the painting A Detail from The Tempest (c. 1862) by Peder Balke, aiming to achieve the integration of meaning, movement and clothing design. The clothing design and performance grow organically through the process of drawing and developing form, aesthetic, visual and physical meaning ‘through the body’. The methodology has developed through theoretical and empirical research that addresses the connectivity between cognitive theory, embodied design and drawing practices.

    Embodied design and communication: drawing with the body and cloth addresses the body as a physical drawing and design tool, as a means of generating performative clothing design and communication that function beyond disciplines and hierarchical production structures.

  • Natalie Brown
    Stitch in the Air

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    Natalie Brown is Programme Director for the Performance Cluster, at London College of Fashion, managing the BA (Hons) courses in Costume, Make-up and Prosthetics, Technical Effects for Performance and the FdA in Hair and Make-up for Film and TV. With her line Natalie Brown Accessories, she has sold her accessory designs in numerous stores in London and on platforms as Farfetch.com. As a designer, she is fascinated with tessellations, multiples and geometric patterns.  In her collections, she combines this fascination with nature’s ability to replicate. Using her line drawings, she cuts, folds and joins leather shapes to craft three-dimensional accessory designs. By using suede and leathers, she exploits the natural characteristics of the different textures to create a tactile contrast for the wearer.


    http://www.nataliebrownaccessories.com/ n.brown@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    Stitch in the Air 

    Artist’s statement

    I intend to investigate the representation of Punto in Aria (‘stitch in the air’) and the Seventeenth century Reticella needle lace work. The intricate, handmade needle lace work uses stitch alone to construct a fabric surface worn around the neck. This neckwear came to symbolise high fashion during the second half of the Sixteenth and early Seventeenth centuries.

    Inspired initially by Rembrandt’s representation of the neckwear seen in paintings such as Portrait of Phillips Lucasz (1635) and Portrait of Aechje Claesdr (1634), my practice led research is concerned with creating neckwear for contemporary fashion, relying on both machine and hand making.

    Using my investigative line drawings from the National Gallery and the laser cutter, I intend to explore the perfection of the digitally drawn and the surprises and imperfections the laser may create when it draws the cut line into fabric.

    Without the digital file intentionally being programmed to have defects, I ask if fabrics and the laser cutter can create their own marks, imperfections and irregularities and add their own visible ‘hand’ to the designed garment. The resulting two dimensional laser drawings are manipulated by hand to create three-dimensional structural surfaces to be worn around the neck.

  • Paul Bevan
    (Up) In the Air

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    Paul Bevan is Programme Director: Media (acting) and Course Leader of the MA Fashion Photography, at London College of Fashion. He has worked in education for over 20 years, developing and leading photography courses across FdA, BA and MA couses in art, design, fashion and communication. In 1997 he established the BA (Hons) Photography course at Southampton Solent University, and went on to develop and deliver undergraduate courses at LCF as Director of Programmes: Fashion Image (2002-2009), moving in 2009 to the School of Graduate Studies. As a lecturer, artist, photographer and writer, he has exhibited and worked internationally, collaborating on numerous creative and industrial initiatives. Bevan explores photography as an experience or event, in both production and dissemination, and questions the relationship between body and image, artist and audience. He is interested in temporal and spatial notions of ‘interface’, which refer to the physical and the metaphysical, as well as in other relational aspects embedded in the process of ‘making’ and ‘viewing’. Since his studies in fine art (BA; MA), and throughout his career, he has maintained a particular research interest in photography and time based media, including performance, within art and fashion.


    www.paulbevan.co.uk www.igallery.org p.bevan@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    (Up) In the Air

    Artist’s statement

    For (Up) In the Air I have drawn on for reference to the painting An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768), by Joseph Wright ‘of Derby’. In this work, which represents a bird chosen as the victim of an experiment as the air is sucked away by a pump, there are significant instances of flight, not least the very defiance of it. The painting presents a sort of liminal moment between life and death, as the bird is clearly unable to fly against the airflow. And yet we are left uncertain as to whether this is to be the only loss. The painting displays a set of individual reactions, ranging from the engaged to the disinterested, with the scientist himself looking at us, the viewers. Both this gaze and the lighting are highly ‘photographic’.

    (Up) In the Air delves into the essence of this work, or at least into an interpretation of it, and aims to enact a similarly liminal response.  Using references to flight, or lack of it, air, force, gravity, and other relational elements, this mise-en-scene intends to draw together a range of static and moving imageries, in an assemblage that gives life to a momentary spectacle but remains hanging (in flight).

  • Simon Thorogood
    Coruscation

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    Simon Thorogood is Senior Research Fellow at London College of Fashion, and a research-led fashion designer, artist and creative consultant, who is constantly looking to expand the boundaries of his discipline by incorporating elements from other domains of design or creation. Within his work, the notion of ‘interactivity’, as well as the role of the audience, is central in determining the course or outcome of a fashion product. From 2002 to 2004, Thorogood was a LCF/V&A designer in residence at the Victoria and Albert Museum. He has exhibited worldwide, and his garments are part of the collection of V&A and the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), New York. He defines his practice as ‘Phashion’, a blend of the scientific term ‘phase transition’ (the transformation of one form or substance to another) and ‘fashion’. Recent research considers how innovation might be applied to the traditional procedure of fashion and pursues the idea of 'growing' design through simple digital systems. His work has been displayed at ICA (Planar, 2008), V&A (Fragment/a, 2004; Spectres: When Fashion Turns Back, 2005), The Museum at FIT, New York (Gothic: Dark Glamour, 2008-2009), Design Museum, Holon, Israel (Mechanical Couture: Fashioning a New Order, 2010), and other numerous venues.

    http://www.simonthorogood.com/ http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/staff/a-z/simon-thorogood/ s.thorogood@fashion.arts.ac.uk

     

     

    Coruscation

    Artist’s statement

    My contribution to Flight: Drawing Interpretations owes its origins to happenstance and particular circumstances that shaped a design story. Flight, aircraft and a notion of travel have long been a prevailing feature in my work. It thus increasingly seemed appropriate for me to become more of an active participant rather than remain an avid adherent of flight. As perhaps the most elementary and visceral form of flying, I began sailplane gliding. This allowed me a more intimate, thorough and dynamic appreciation of flight, and sanctioned a new appreciation of my surroundings and the ‘landscape’.

    I am also a collector of vintage flying jackets and about the same time as starting this project I procured a fairly rare 1943 US Army Air Forces AN-J-3A issue. The jacket was characterized by a faded service insignia – a bolt of lightning flanked by two dices – which distinguished the USAAF VPB 16th squadron based in the Palau Islands in 1944. The lightning bolt and dices symbolize both a concept of luck and the electronic nature of the squadron’s communications remit. This resonates and corresponds with predominant themes in my work, namely the exploration of chance, or accident, and the application of technology to a process of fashion design.

    In Mountain Landscape with Lightning (c. 1675) by Francisque Millet, to which I chose to respond, the central focus of the canvas is the lightning bolt forking from the heavens above a seated couple looking up in awe. Millet is not known to have actually visited or crossed the Alps, and his landscape is considered to be imaginary but the realism of the mountain scenery in the painting is impressive.

    The lightning bolt is peculiarly identical in the flight jacket and Millet’s painting, in terms of scale, angle, aspect, forking and the dark framing. It typifies both pieces and establishes a dynamic bond between them. Through Coruscation I propose to chronicle a linear yet abstracted correlation between Millets’s Landscape with Lightning and the specific aircraft operated by the VPB-16 squadron, the Martin Mariner Seaplane. By identifying sequences, panels and sections from the Mariner Seaplane, I intend to return, overlay and superimpose these over Millet’s landscape and thereby establish a supporting new ‘aircraft landscape’. The chance aspect of the work emerges from the arbitrary, unexpected and spontaneous mixes of ‘landscape’ compositions. This process of coruscation nurtures and nourishes my understanding of drawing, as a method of ‘travelling’, of being familiar and unfamiliar with something or somewhere.

  • Xenia Capacete Caballero
    Weaving Nests. Tracing the Invisible

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    Xenia Capacete Caballero is alumnus of the MA Fashion Curation, London College of Fashion. She studied History of Art at Lleida University, in Spain, and Costume Making for Performances at Wimbledon College of Art. She has obtained an AHRC grant for her Master project ‘The use of Holograms in Fashion Curation Practice'. Her emerging curatorial practice and research interests extend across diverse fields such as mapping, tracing traumas, history and culture of the body, and digital technologies. Capacete Caballero has worked as archive assistant at Burberry, installation assistant at Sotheby’s, and has collaborated with Marks & Spencer on a project involving Oxfam Clothes Exchange and London College of Fashion's Centre for Sustainable Fashion. She has curated and designed the installation for the International Fashion Showcase – Emerging Portuguese Fashion, during London Fashion Week, February 2013.

    http://showtime.arts.ac.uk/xeniacapacetecaballero xenia.capacete@gmail.com

     

     

    Weaving Nests. Tracing the Invisible

    Artist’s statement

    Xenia Capacete Caballero explores movement and location through various techniques as drawing, painting, photography and textiles. Her artwork, titled Weaving Nests. Tracing the Invisible, takes the form of maps and patterns that let unexpected narratives emerge. She states:

    ‘In responding to a painting that apparently does not represent a narrative, nor characters, my work aims to make silent details visible and create a narrative by drawing out and connecting together marks on the wall. These marks are interpreted as geographical coordinates and musical scores. A Wall in Naples (1782) by Thomas Jones evokes notions of stasis and location, as well as migration and mapping. In exploring these themes, I analyse and contrast current forced migrations that are also frequently unperceived and some forms of sound.’

    The sound piece is the result of the collaboration with cellist Juliet Sampson and artist and writer Nabil Ahmed.

  • Yuliya Krylova
    Leda’s Womb

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    Yuliya Krylova is alumnus of the MA Costume for Performance, London College of Fashion, and was awarded the 2009 Student of the Year Award in the category of Design for Performance. She has been assistant to Agnes Treplin for The Marriage of Figaro, Opera at Iford Arts, and designer for the Barbican and Bash Green Forest project. She currently works as freelance costume designer. For Krylova, drawing is one of the key elements of the designing process, defining her work as a costume designer. Her graduating project ‘4.48 Psychosis’, inspired to Sarah Kane’s work, explored through costume different states of mind of a person suffering from depression. Recent productions include site specific performances devised through collaboration with other artists.  





    www.thehouseofdreams.co.uk y_krylova@yahoo.com

     

     

    Leda’s Womb

    Artist’s statement

    Yuliya Krilova’s work explores myths, the transition from Paganism to Christianity, poetry (Hilda Doolittle, William Yeats), feminist art, science, psychology, and concentrates on the theme of the phallic mother. Taking inspiration from Leda and the Swan (after 1530) by Michelangelo, she immerses in a dialogue with the practice of artists as Cy Twombly, Joseph Beuys, Salvador Dalí, Hokusai and Rebecca Horn, to give life to a performance piece. Devised together with Butoh choreographer Marie Gabrielle Rotie, the performance Leda’s Womb is developed through drawing. This develops, through out the process, into the creation of the costume and is later explored though film and live choreography interaction. She states:

    ‘I use drawing as initiating tool for creative research, and it often evolves into a process with its own outcomes. Drawing allows me to generate and put together ideas that exist in the subconscious. I draw to create’.

    The phallic mother is the image and idea explored in relation to the painting Leda and the Swan. Writings of Sigmund Freud, Otto Rank, Julia Kristeva, and Marcia Ian are the influences shaping the vision and concept at the origin of the performance. As Marcia Ian states:

    ‘The phantom umbilical cord signifies our connection, or lack of it, to that which is and is not us. Do you feel “cut off” from others? (You are). Do you feel that your very being leaks out of you every time you let down your guard? (It does, it does – even when your guard is up.)’ (Ian, 1993: 32)

    Ian, M. (1993) Remembering the Phallic Mother. Psychoanalysis, Modernism and the Fetish, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.