Inspiration.

Agnes Treplin
BODY and SOUL

The painting Dead Christ Mourned by Two Angels (1617-18) by Guercino represents the starting point for my investigation into the phenomenon or essence called ‘soul’ and, as in this case, the absence of it. My interest is to find a way to manifest and express in a three-dimensional form motifs and ideas that are not physical.

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Simon Thorogood
Coruscation

My contribution to Flight: Drawing Interpretations owes its origins to happenstance and particular circumstances that shaped a design story. Flight, aircraft and a notion of travel have long been a prevailing feature in my work.

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Carolina Rieckhof
Samson’s fears

In focussing on Samson and Delilah (c. 1609-1610) by Rubens, I was initially interested in representing Delilah’s thoughts, but while researching on Samson and Delilah’s story, I found inspiration in the psychological interpretations of this painting, which rather point to Samson fears.

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Yuliya Krylova
Leda’s Womb

Yuliya Krilova’s work explores myths, the transition from Paganism to Christianity, poetry (Hilda Doolittle, William Yeats), feminist art, science, psychology, and concentrates on the theme of the phallic mother.

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Andrew Kenny
Ode to Colin Wiggins

The National Gallery was founded ‘to give the people an ennobling enjoyment’ (Parliamentary Commission, 1857), and this democratic approach to high-art is what I intend to explore within my contribution to Flight: Drawing Interpretations. My aim is to find out how people today gain this ‘ennobling enjoyment’ and, in particular, how this relates to the specialism of Textiles for Fashion.

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Charlotte Hodes
Apparition, a series of papercuts

I have approached the project Flight: Drawing Interpretations as a conversation with selected paintings in the National Gallery in order to address some of the themes that continue to preoccupy me in my fine art practice.

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Caroline Collinge
Unfolding the box

I have been researching A Peepshow with Views of the Interior of a Dutch House (c. 1655-60) by Samuel van Hoogstraten: a Baroque perspective box that uses multiple-perspective to create the sensation of flight through the optical perception of movement.

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Xenia Capacete Caballero
Weaving Nests. Tracing the Invisible

Xenia Capacete Caballero explores movement and location through various techniques as drawing, painting, photography and textiles. Her artwork, titled Weaving Nests. Tracing the Invisible, takes the form of maps and patterns that let unexpected narratives emerge.

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Dr. Jessica Bugg
Drawing with the body and cloth

My work for Flight: Drawing Interpretations seeks to extend design methods for clothing in contemporary dance. Costume design, and specifically costume design for contemporary dance, tends to be applied to a specific choreography as opposed to being central to the development of the performance and communication itself.

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Natalie Brown
Stitch in the Air

I intend to investigate the representation of Punto in Aria (‘stitch in the air’) and the Seventeenth century Reticella needle lace work. The intricate, handmade needle lace work uses stitch alone to construct a fabric surface worn around the neck. This neckwear came to symbolise high fashion during the second half of the Sixteenth and early Seventeenth centuries.

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Paul Bevan
(Up) In the Air

For (Up) In the Air I have drawn on for reference to the painting An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump (1768), by Joseph Wright 'of Derby'. In this work, which represents a bird chosen as the victim of an experiment as the air is sucked away by a pump, there are significant instances of flight, not least the very defiance of it.

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Project Outline
From the Curators

Flight: Drawing Interpretations is the culmination of work at the National Gallery in response to the theme of ‘Flight’, developed over the course of a year by a group of practice-led researchers at  London College of Fashion, representing a range of disciplines as fashion design, fine art, fashion illustration, textile design, costume and dance. The final outcomes have taken a variety of  forms  including direct drawing on paper, animation,  film, costume,  performance and fashion design.

Initiated by Charlotte Hodes, Professor in Fine Art at London College of Fashion and Colin Wiggins, Special Projects Curator at the National Gallery. This project is the exploration of how historical images can provide triggers for creative contemporary practice. The project also addresses what can be revealed through a direct engagement with specific paintings and the value of  working from primary sources.

Drawing, as a means of investigation, of thinking and articulating ideas has played a pivotal role in the research and creative process.  Collectively, the outcomes reveal ways in which drawing is  used by  creative practitioners, within their thinking and working methodology. In addition, it  highlights the considerable hybrid activity across the subject disciplines,  which includes the use of analogue and digital processes together with film, live performance and installation.

The project outcomes are represented here online alongside a Friday Late showcase of performances and temporary installations at The National Gallery taking place on 14 June 2013, which follows a symposium on 24 May 2013, with speakers exploring the project concepts in further detail.

 

Curatorial Statement

The collaborative project Flight: Drawing Interpretations is characterised by two main parallel challenges: from the artistic perspective, responding to the paintings  of the National Gallery collection, and on a curatorial level, contextualising the new responses within a different, both virtual and actual, space.

The stylised National Gallery floor plan has been the point of departure for our curatorial approach, representing the primary chance for a reflection on curating itself. Gradually abstracting from the original  Gallery space, we have outlined a virtual map for the artworks created by the participants.

In sketching our curatorial contribution, we have graphically and conceptually synthesized the floorplan of the Gallery through the notion of negative space. This has been functional in symbolising the integration of the original paintings belonging to the Gallery and the responses elaborated by the participants to Flight: Drawing Interpretations. Our intention is to emphasise, in curatorial and graphic terms, the endless nature of the process of interpretation. The map of references woven by the artworks resulting from this collaboration could be further expanded, with its limits or borders being potentially stretched ad infinitum.

Experimenting with the boundaries between physical and virtual spaces, this curatorial intervention culminates in an online interactive exhibition and website, alongside a Friday Late showcase of performances and installations, at the National Gallery.

From the curatorial perspective, the physically unrestrictive potential of online media both compliments and compensates for the temporary nature of the Friday Late event. In collaboration with design studio She Was Only, our initial concept has been translated into an online experience. The design of the site allows the audience to create their own journey and narrative through the works, as opposed to the conventional sequence of a physical exhibition.

The ‘physical’ component of this project comes in the form of a single experince of performances and temporary installations, fleeting in its nature, yet captured and preserved online.

 

Dr Flavia Loscialpo

Through her curatorial practice and research, Dr Flavia Loscialpo has collaborated with several institutions, among which the Barbican Centre, Victoria and Albert Museum, London College of Fashion. In 2011, she co-curated, with Prof. Charlotted Hodes, Drawing and the Body (2011), an exchange exhibition between London College of Fashion and The Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, Sweden. She is currently Senior Lecturer in Fashion and MA Coordinator at Solent Southampton University.  Her research interests focus on historical and contemporary avant-gardes in art, design and fashion. She is specialized in curation, philosophy of language, aesthetics, and fashion theory.

Flavia Loscialpo obtained her PhD in Philosophy from Sapienza University of Rome (2008), and is alumnus of the MA Fashion Curation.
For this project, she explores, with Ben Whyman and Fiona Mckay, how the theme of flight is echoed in the work of the various participants, and works at translating the curatorial challenges through a convergence of media.

 

Fiona Mckay 

Fiona Mckay is a London-based curator. Following her BA degree in Art History from Goldsmith’s College, London, she spent several years in the creative industries and completed an Art and Design Foundation at Central Saint Martin’s, then embarking on the MA Fashion Curation at London College Fashion.  With a focus on interpreting the ideas around fashion and design into both physical and digital spaces, Fiona’s curatorial practice demonstrates a convergence of interests in fashion artifacts, personal histories and digital technology. These are combined with her background and experience in art history, fashion and architecture. She has recently co-curated the exhibition Footprints Studio (2013), Central Saint Martins’ Museum and Study Collection.

Within the Flight: Drawing Interpretations, Fiona is involved in the co-curation of the online exhibition and website, and in the final showcase at the National Gallery Friday Late.

Ben Whyman

Ben Whyman has curated fashion exhibitions in London and the United States, as well as publishing work on film, contemporary art and fashion. Recent research has considered curatorial interventions using dress to improve engagement with marginalised groups, specifically those living with mental illness.

His current research interests lie in exploring the relationship between material culture analysis and life-writing methodologies. He is alumnus of the MA Fashion Curation and has recently commenced a PhD at London College of Fashion exploring material culture analysis, life writing, and biographical and museological interpretations of men’s wardrobes.
At London College of Fashion he is Project Coordinator for the Fashion Curation research office, closely working with professors Amy de la Haye and Judith Clark.

He is co-curating the outcomes of the project Flight: Drawing Interpretations with Flavia Loscialpo and Fiona Mckay, exploring the use of drawing as a tool to analyse, contextualise, and conceptualise understanding around space and the object within the curatorial practice.